Random Article


 
Must See..
 

StarCraft II: Legacy Of The Void (PC) Review

 
StarCraft_II_Legacy_of_the_Void_Logo
StarCraft_II_Legacy_of_the_Void_Logo
StarCraft_II_Legacy_of_the_Void_Logo

 
At a Glance...
 

Formats: PC (Reviewed), Mac
 
Genre:
 
Year:
 
Publisher:
 
Developer:
 
Final Score
9.0
9.0/ 10


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


  • Great fun to play
  • The new co-op modes add an interesting twist to the gameplay
  • Gameplay is as solid as ever
  • An absolute tonne of things to do
  • Not so much?


  • Campaign's plot is a little on the clichéd side


  • Final Fiendish Findings?

    Legacy Of The Void is a fine and fun final entry in the StarCraft II trilogy. The gameplay has been excellently polished at this stage, and this campaign is the most fun of the three. The new co-op modes add a nice bit of variety to things as well, and there’s competitive multiplayer options to suit all levels of skill and commitment. The campaign’s plot is a little on the clichéd side, but everything wraps up nicely and there is an absolute tonne of content that will keep you busy for a long time.

    0
    Posted November 21, 2015 by

     
    Full Fiendish Findings...
     
     

    The trilogy reaches it’s conclusion.

     

    I

    t’s been five years since StarCraft II made its appearance with ‘Wings of Liberty’, which was the first part of a trilogy which was originally intended to be a standalone game with two expansion packs.  The second part, ‘Heart of the Swarm’, was originally released as an expansion but was changed to be just a standalone game earlier this year.  Now, the final part of the trilogy, ‘Legacy of the Void’, has finally surfaced, and sees the conclusion of the story that’s been told over the last 5 years.

    Legacy of the Void is a standalone expansion pack which sees you playing through a campaign as the Protoss, led by the Hierarch Artanis, as he looks to unite the splintered Protoss against an evil that threatens to destroy all of creation and recreate it in his image.  This takes place over a lengthy campaign with a bunch of characters both new and familiar.

    With this being part of the StarCraft II trilogy, nothing has really changed on the gameplay front.  There are a couple of new units to play around with, and some changes have been made to existing units, but it’s the same game.  The Protoss are arguably the most fun race to play, with their ability to change unit production structures to be able to warp units into any area of the battlefield within pylon range really giving you something to play with.

    legacy1

    As with the previous campaigns, you have a central command area from which you can customise various things about your army, and this time, there really is a whole heap of things to choose from to really allow you to play exactly how you want.  First up, each particular unit type has three different versions, one for each Protoss faction and each having different abilities.  In addition, the protoss ship itself has a bunch of abilities and modifications you can tailor to suit your needs, with the ability to reduce build times and increase initial unit capacity, and there are also various abilities you can choose from, just as a temporary mega speed boost to production, or the ability to warp a pylon instantly to any suitable area of the battlefield.  You need to gather solarite to allow you to use certain abilities, which is gained by completing certain objectives in missions, but how you distribute your solarite is entirely up to you.

    The main single player campaign contains about 20 missions which have a few different twists on gameplay but for the most part follow the standard build a base and destroy/defend/collect something while making sure your base doesn’t fall.  The Protoss campaign is arguably the most fun of the three campaigns to play though, with all it’s customisation options, even if the plot of the campaign is a little uninspired and clichéd by Blizzard’s usual standards, with its “everyone unites against the villain” storyline.  But the characters are interesting and their interactions with each other push the story forward.

    legacy2

    There have been some interesting additions to multiplayer as well.  In addition to some unit tweaks and new units to try out, there are new mini 1v1 tournaments that happen frequently, allowing you to jump in and get a quick eSports style fix.  In addition, there is a whole co-op mode, which sees you and another player controlling the same base and units taking on some extra missions, which is good if you’re, say, strong at base building but not so good at organising an attack force.  There are a number of heroes to choose from, which change exactly what kind of army you end up with, meaning you get a different experience between the heroes of the same faction.  It’s an interesting twist on the standard campaign.  There’s also a competitive multiplayer version with you going head to head with another team, although it’s not quite as enjoyable.

    Despite the core game being a few years old, StarCraft II still looks pretty good, with simple but good looking visuals and some great CGI scenes, which Blizzard has got pretty much down at this stage.  And as always, there’s a fitting soundtrack playing as you attempt to sweep all before you, with some decent voice acting as well.

    FINAL THOUGHTS
    Legacy Of The Void is a fine and fun final entry in the StarCraft II trilogy.  The gameplay has been excellently polished at this stage, and this campaign is the most fun of the three.  The new co-op modes add a nice bit of variety to things as well, and there’s competitive multiplayer options to suit all levels of skill and commitment.  The campaign’s plot is a little on the clichéd side, but everything wraps up nicely and there is an absolute tonne of content that will keep you busy for a long time.

    The product under review was provided by the creator, manufacturer, publisher or their PR representative free of charge and without caveat. Please see our site review policy for more information.

    Mike Jones

     
    Mike first started writing about video games at the age of 10 when he wrote a Sonic Chaos review for his school newspaper, and hasn't looked back since. Favourite game genres include MMOs, racing games and puzzlers, but he'll try most things once.