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Red Crow Mysteries: Legion (Mac) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Formats: Mac
 
Genre:
 
Year:
 
Publisher:
 
Final Score
7.0
7/ 10


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


Challenging yet logical puzzles make for solid game play.

Not so much?


Underdeveloped story line disappoints.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Red Crow Mysteries: Legion is a good combination of point and click adventuring and hidden object finding. While it really brings nothing new to the table, the game play is pretty solid – challenging yet logical, as it should be. However, an underdeveloped story line fails to draw gamers into the story, leaving you feeling as if you never really got what was going on.

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Posted June 20, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

My name is Legion; for we are many.”1

Those are familiar words, interpreted here as a jumping point for a hidden object/point and click adventure with a spooky paranormal theme – a theme that, unfortunately, never really explains itself. As you begin the game, your character awakens in her own room, but with the sense that something has inexplicably changed. A series of ghostly visits from your deceased mother explain the story as you advance in the game. It seems, in times long past, an evil creature named Legion has threatened the world we hold dear. Each time he has appeared to wreak havoc, one special person has stepped up to thwart his evil plans. It seems you are the one now chosen for the job, but first you must prove yourself by passing the tests set up by those who came before you.

These tests consist of wandering around the area and finding objects to put together or use in various different ways. Red Crow Mysteries does not make use of the standard, fixed screen object jumbles that you’ll find in many games of this type. Instead, each area you enter will have a list of items to search for as you wander around. Each item you collect will then be placed in your inventory, for you to use now or in other areas in order to advance in the game. Some items must be combined with others before you can use them – for instance, a sponge that is first dipped in water and then combined with soap to create a useful cleaning tool. Others may require you to explore several areas in order to find multiples of a single item that can then be used to unlock a new spot.

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Red Crow Mysteries: Legion plays out a lot like your favorite point and click adventure, and most of the items you’ll find and use actually make sense within the story, making your biggest challenge puzzling out how to use the items you have found. In addition, you are also treated to series of mini games hidden throughout the game, which serve to offer both challenge and variety to your play.  These range from re-assembling ripped pictures to Sudoku style number games, and all are completely skippable after a short time if they aren’t your thing.

My biggest issue with Red Crow Mysteries: Legion is that there really isn’t much of anything to distinguish it from every other game out there. The object finding and combining are done well, the mini games are diverting enough, and the paranormal theme is a popular one. If there was a really good story line to tie it all together, I think it would fast become a favorite. As it is, the story is barely covered, and you are left with a feeling that you’ve only just started when you see the final credits. A little more fleshing out, both as to who you are and what your abilities actually are, would go a long way. Similarly, the evil one you are fighting is barely touched upon – what does he do, why has he come, how are you to defeat him? Who knows? Instead of actually fighting evil, you are generally just fixing up old cars and repairing fuse boxes.

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Red Crow Mysteries: Legion is a good combination of point and click adventuring and hidden object finding. While it really brings nothing new to the table, the game play is pretty solid – challenging yet logical, as it should be. However, an underdeveloped story line fails to draw gamers into the story, leaving you feeling as if you never really got what was going on.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)