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Swim Little Fish Swim (Film) Review

 
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At A Glance...
 

Genre:
 
Length: 95 minutes
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
2.5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


It's an interesting look at a couple struggling to reconnect as both obviously want different things for their future.

Not so much?


It really just leaves you wondering what you watched, as little gets resolved in any satisfactory way.


Final Fiendish Findings?

*The* most hipster film you’ll see all year. Swim Little Fish Swim is a film about a couple that is growing apart, and a young artist who is struggling to get out from under her famous mother’s shadow and make a name for herself.  Leeward fancies himself to be a struggling artist. He loves his […]

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Posted November 22, 2015 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings?
 
 

*The* most hipster film you’ll see all year.

Swim Little Fish Swim is a film about a couple that is growing apart, and a young artist who is struggling to get out from under her famous mother’s shadow and make a name for herself.  Leeward fancies himself to be a struggling artist. He loves his music, and he simply isn’t willing to compromise himself as an artist in order to conform to society’s image of who he should be. Unfortunately, artistic ideals don’t pay the bills…but Leeward doesn’t worry about that. Instead, he invites anyone and everywhere to share in his company. This means his tiny apartment is often full of fellow wandering artists, who often stay up late talking about life’s struggles, have impromptu jam sessions late in the night, and even crash on his couch. Life is good for Leeward, and he’s convinced that his big break will happen soon.

Leeward doesn’t seem to recognize that his freewheeling artist ways are only possible because of his wife’s hard work. Mary is a dedicated nurse who works all night long to keep their small family afloat. Leeward’s only job is to take care of their young daughter while she’s at work. Mary prepares her meals before she leaves, and instructs Leeward about things like bedtime – but he can’t be bothered to stick to any sort of schedule. Mary loves her husband, but what she really wants is a more stable home for her family…and a “for sale” sign on a nearby house might just be thing that pushes her over the edge.

Finally, we have Lilas. Lilas has a loving family who wants to connect with her, but she is convinced she must make it on her own first. Using a retro video recorder, she puts together snapshots of the world around her, putting her own stamp on what it all means. Though her videos are interesting, they have yet to catch the eye of someone who can help her actually make it. Her mother is a respected artist herself, and it’s like Lilas needs to prove something to her before she is willing to return home to France. She ends up crashing on Leeward’s couch, spending time with the fellow artist while his wife is constantly out working.

It all sounds a lot like a setup for the whole “frustrated husband falls for the young nanny” type of film, but it really doesn’t play out that way. For one thing, though Lilas watches Maggie/Rainbow a little bit here and there, Leeward is never working so they kind of all three hang out together. The movie is more like one long tribute to being a struggling artist. Leeward and Lilas are happy to live off Mary’s largesse, and both come off as rather spoiled. If they aren’t willing to actually make money off their art, they could at least contribute in some other way. The art is all that matters…and that really does the artwork a disservice – and makes you feel sorry for Mary, even as she’s portrayed as someone who desperately wants her husband to be something he’s not.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)