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Review- Aqua Seafoam Shame, A Documentary

 
Aqua
Aqua
Aqua

 
At A Glance...
 

Age Rating:
 
Length: 1 Hour
 
Studio: Hope Studios
 
Story Line: The Pacific Ocean Trash Vortex by Hawaii is a more serious issue than any war, economic, or ecologic crisis facing the planet today.
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
1/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


I now know what the Pacific Trash Vortex is.

Not so much?


Everything else.


Final Fiendish Findings?

    Truly good documentaries are an art form. To make your audience care and empathize with the subject matter while at the same time calling them to action without feeling forced is a skill not to be underestimated. In Aqua Seafoam Shame the subject matter is the Pacific Ocean Trash Vortex, though from the […]

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Posted March 18, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings?
 
 

 

 

Truly good documentaries are an art form. To make your audience care and empathize with the subject matter while at the same time calling them to action without feeling forced is a skill not to be underestimated. In Aqua Seafoam Shame the subject matter is the Pacific Ocean Trash Vortex, though from the documentary you’d never really know it.

From the beginning of this odd documentary you are introduced to The Surf Lady, Veronica Grey. There is no explanation of who she is, the audience just takes it on faith that this woman filming her self on her iPhone is someone with authority on the Trash Vortex. It quickly becomes apparent she is not. Throughout the film she keeps regurgitating the same 5 or 6 facts about the vortex and it quickly becomes a series of awkwardly transitioning shots of her in a wet suit on the local news spewing those same tidbits of information. The iPhone videos of her talking at a local Hawaii coffee shop or calling up companies to ask them to change to plastic bottles could have been interesting had she offered new information in each or if they didn’t cut off half way through sentences and transition into really awkward photo slideshows backed up by horribly generic free license music. As it is the content is repetitive and neither calls the audience to act or holds their attention, accept perhaps in an “oh my god this is a train-wreck and I can’t look away” way.

The Pacific Trash Vortex for those of us who were unaware is a large island in the Pacific Ocean made up of non-biodegradable plastics. The island was the size of Texas a few years ago, it is now the size of the continental United States. Besides being horrible to look at it’s detrimental to the sea and the aquatic life that inhabits it. It is a serious ecological issue and deserves our time and attention however this documentary seems to be more of an outlet for Veronica Grey on her quest for attention than a planet-wide call to action.

The interviews she does have in the documentary are either A) taken from another production or B) haphazardly put together. All are interspersed oddly in between awkward clips of Veronica on as many daytime talk shows, local news reports or filming her self on her iPhone as possible. At one point there is a clip of her taking phone calls on a local cable access show about the problem of non-biodegradable plastics,a section of the film I had hope would offer us more insight and information int o the problem and methods of prevention. However  during these segments it seemed “The Surf Lady” had problems answering the most simple questions, even about every day waste disposal. Which is surprising as multiple times in the documentary she claimed to be dedicating her life to the issue.

The only good thing I can say about this documentary is that it called my attention to the issue to begin with. I knew nothing about the Pacific Trash Vortex and now I know a little more than that. However if you are serious about conservation and/or ecological preservation I would say search out something more worth your time. This is not the documentary you are looking for.


Laurel Deneen

 
Lover of movies, television, theater, comics and general nerdery, Laurel hails from Minneapolis Minnesota. She has a geeky husband who requires more than the average amount of attention, a dog who thinks she's a dragon and she secretly longs to be a penguin.


  • Oh, I love a good indie documentary—but some of them definitely need a little professional help. :/