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Let God (Movie) Review

 
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At A Glance...
 

Genre: ,
 
Length: 91 mins
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
3/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


A true to life depiction of life in the mid-1800s.

Not so much?


Shows you rather than tells you, in a back and forth style that is at times hard to follow.


Final Fiendish Findings?

“When all is lost, there is hope.” Let God is a film that sets out to remind viewers that when all seems lost, there is always a shining beacon of hope pointing us in the right direction – even if we don’t always recognize it at first. Set in the mid-1800’s during the California gold […]

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Posted March 3, 2014 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings?
 
 

“When all is lost, there is hope.”

Let God is a film that sets out to remind viewers that when all seems lost, there is always a shining beacon of hope pointing us in the right direction – even if we don’t always recognize it at first. Set in the mid-1800’s during the California gold rush, it follows the tale of a young woman who has seemingly lost everything.

Amelia is a young housewife in hopeless debt. As rumors abound of gold in the California hills, her husband Levi decides that a hasty exit is the best way for the two of them to both shed their debts and make a fresh start. Although Amelia is hesitant to leave her family and friends behind, she does as she has been taught and obeys her husband. The two set off with a wagon train at the end of the season, dangerously close to winter, and soon find themselves face to face with the dangers of the Oregon trail. When Levi meets with a tragic fate, Amelia is left all on her own in the unforgiving wilderness. Will God answer her pleas for a sign, or is all hope lost?

I loved the concept of Let God. It has all the elements of a great historical film – the Gold Rush, the Oregon trail, unlikely companions, and a commitment to representing the time period faithfully. And in a lot of ways it delivers on that promise. Amelia dresses and acts exactly as you’d expect from a young housewife of that time period, and the scenery is a stunning and unforgiving representation of what the wagon trains encountered. What I didn’t like as much was the way Amelia’s story was presented.

The story in Let God is told in two advancing story lines. As we begin the film, we meet Amelia, floundering in her first days alone in the wilderness. As we watch her begin to find her way, we learn what it is that has brought her to this place in a series of flashbacks. You watch a little of Amelia in the wilderness, then a little before she left home, then a little more in the wilderness, and so forth. What that means is you don’t actually know the full story of what has happened before until the movie is almost finished. It left a little too much up in the air for me. On top of that, the portions that show Amelia in the wilderness have very little actual dialogue of any sort, making it a movie where you really have to infer a lot from what you see.

Let God is an interesting take on a faith based historical film. As we watch a young woman flounder alone in an unforgiving wilderness, we are shown how very brutal life was at the time. And though faith comes up here and there in the film, it is only at the end that we understand the “Let God” reference in the title. For fans of historical films, it offers a realistic take on the times, albeit one of few words.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)