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King’s Faith (Movie) Review

 
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At A Glance...
 

Genre:
 
Director:
 
Actor: , , ,
 
Length: 108 minutes
 
Release Date: April 26, 2013
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
4/ 5


User Rating
2 total ratings

 

We liked?


Doesn't shy away from difficult issues.

Not so much?


Perhaps tries to do a bit too much, at times.


Final Fiendish Findings?

King’s Faith is, above all, a film about second chances. Even if you don’t choose the right path the first time, there will always be the opportunity to turn it around, should you choose to do so. The main character, played by Crawford Wilson, comes off as a pretty realistic teenager. He’s a bit angry, a bit confused, and he doesn’t always choose the right path, but he’s determined to try to do right, despite the challenges he faces. While

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Posted March 27, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings?
 
 

After spending his childhood in foster home after foster home, Brendan King is hoping that eighteen’s a charm.

Brendan has faced nothing but adversity in his young life. His parents are gone. His neighborhood is riddled with crime and gangs. He watched his very good friend die before his very eyes, and then spent three years in juvenile detention. His is a story that, unfortunately, is repeated in city after city all across America, and most of these young souls never make it out of their cycle of violence and despair. Luckily, Brendan has a couple of things going for him that the others don’t: his newfound faith, and a foster dad who refuses to give up on him. The rest…is up to Brendan.

King’s Faith is an (obviously) faith based film that doesn’t attempt to sugarcoat things, and it is rather a breath of fresh air. While Brendan’s struggles to keep on the straight and narrow path, and to stay true to his faith, are obviously a main focus of the movie, it is all very real. This is a movie that takes on the tough choices many kids are facing today, and unapologetically says “This is going to be hard.”

Actually, that is one criticism I do have of the film – that it maybe tries to take on too much. Brendan deals with issues, naturally, stemming from growing up in a series of foster homes, not having a family to look after him, time spent incarcerated, giving up his old ways, and fitting in at a new school. But between all the main characters, there are a plethora of major issues, from drug use and abortion, to dealing with the death of a child to letting go of guilt. It is all a lot to take in, and while the movie doesn’t claim that all the characters have every problem tied up neatly with a bow at the end, there is a general sense that everyone is going to be great. Of course, that does play off the theme that having faith in a greater good will lead to happiness, so it’s good in that sense.

The main story line in the film, that of Brendan King, is an engrossing one. While he struggles to let go of the past and move on with a new, better life, ghosts from his past make it difficult for him to do so. Gang members are not known for their ability to forgive and forget, and when his old life threatens all he holds dear, he’ll have to make some difficult decisions about where his life is going to go. While he bolsters up the faith of those around him throughout the film, he finds out how difficult it is to stick to what’s right. Brendan doesn’t always make the right decisions – in fact, he’s made a ton of bad ones in his short life – and that’s what makes this film relatable.

King’s Faith is, above all, a film about second chances. Even if you don’t choose the right path the first time, there will always be the opportunity to turn it around, should you choose to do so. The main character, played by Crawford Wilson, comes off as a pretty realistic teenager. He’s a bit angry, a bit confused, and he doesn’t always choose the right path, but he’s determined to try to do right, despite the challenges he faces. While all the characters in the film are struggling, it is Brendan who sets the tone for the film. As a word of caution for families, there are a lot of difficult themes addressed, particularly violence and drugs, so it isn’t a good choice for younger kids. However, for families with older children, it’s a great way to open up discussions about everything from drugs and abortion, to how you can make a difference in someone else’s life.

 


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)