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Criminel (iOs) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Formats: iOs
 
Genre:
 
Year:
 
Developer:
 
Final Score
6.5
6.5/ 10


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


An interesting take on murder mystery, with an antique vibe that serves well to immerse players in the story

Not so much?


It's quite short, leaving you feeling there should be something more.


Final Fiendish Findings?

“One can only see what one observes, and one observes only things which are already in the mind.” Criminel is an interesting take on the idea of a crime game. With its funky film noir vibe and 19th century France setting, it’s certainly unlike anything you’ve played before. But uniqueness isn’t everything – every game […]

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Posted July 8, 2015 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“One can only see what one observes, and one observes only things which are already in the mind.”
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Criminel is an interesting take on the idea of a crime game. With its funky film noir vibe and 19th century France setting, it’s certainly unlike anything you’ve played before. But uniqueness isn’t everything – every game needs a lot more than a new angle to keep players engaged. Though there are both good and bad aspects to Criminel, overall it’s an interesting game that is worth playing – even if it is a rather brief experience.

In Criminel, you play as a novice photographer who has taken on work with the local police department to earn income in your new trade. As police photographer, it’s up to you t photograph the evidence at crime scenes, ensuring that the detective will be able to piece together what happened when you’re back back at the station. The challenge part comes in here, as you are given no guidance as to what is evidence and what is not. You must examine each crime scene carefully, and take pictures of each piece of evidence.

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Your camera will only take pictures of legitimate evidence, so you won’t be snapping a million pictures and trying to figure out what’s important. However, in order for the camera to show up, you need to be looking at the evidence at just the right angle, which can be frustrating when you’re sure something is evidence but can’t get a picture. The game will not allow you to advance until all of the evidence has been documented, and there aren’t hints of any sort, so you really have to comb over every piece of the crime scene and examine things at every angle until you get everything. The crime scenes generally consist of just a few rooms though, so that isn’t as trying as it could be.

Once the evidence has been gathered, you head back to the station to check it out. The station consists of a maze of corridors bathed in an eerie red light. You travel through them until you find the room you need. The first room will contain a board with all of the pictures assembled in order. You examine each one, clicking on any words that pop up, to get a good idea of what happened. Then, you move onto to witness testimony. This consists of a paragraph or two of text. Here, you must click on any important words that will help identify the perpetrator. The final step is to look through a list of suspects and choose which one best fits both the crime and the witness testimony.

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Once you have solved the crime, you move on to the next crime scene, which plays out in the same way – pictures, photo board, witness testimony, choose a suspect. However, you soon begin to notice a pattern emerging in the crimes. It becomes apparent that some larger plot is at work at here, and it’s ultimately going to be up to you to figure out what is going on. Overall, it’s a good story line, and an interesting premise.

Criminel tries to both a game and an interactive story, and somehow comes up a little short on both – likely because the game itself is quite short, so it leaves you feeling that there should be more. That being said, searching through the crime scenes and pinpointing a suspect are fun, and they do get you into the story. It’s just that the story itself feels like it should have been more developed. The game’s visuals are both engaging – in that it does give you that 19th century feel – and a little annoying at times. Because everything has the look of an old faded photograph, you find that the challenge is sometimes more about being able to see than the evidence being truly difficult to find. Still, it’s an interesting game that is refreshing in its different way of doing things, and a nice (albeit short) play for mystery fans.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)