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White Horse (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

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Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
5/ 5


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We liked?


Absolutely gripping tale; very well written.

Not so much?


Some graphic content may offend sensitive or young readers.


Final Fiendish Findings?

White Horse is an absolutely riveting read, and it doesn’t shy away from difficult topics that would definitely arise in an actual end of the world scenario. There is some difficult subject content, such as incest and graphic violence, so I would not recommend for any but the most mature teens. But these things do not define the book; they simply serve to add realism and give readers a true sense of the horror Zoe faces day to day. White Horse is a masterfully written tale, well worth reading, and would make a great gift for the book lover in your life.

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Posted December 18, 2012 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“The world you knew, that we all knew, is gone. Humanity is mostly dead and what’s left is dying.”

The end of the world is becoming an increasingly popular entertainment topic of late (particularly this week with the whole Mayan calendar thing). I think it’s that “what if?” fear inside all of us that makes this topic resonate so well, and that makes it so easy for us to get sucked into stories of the end of days. But what if it isn’t nuclear war, or zombies, or divine intervention that  causes the apocalypse? What if it’s us, humans, that bring about our own downfall, by messing with weather and biology to the point that we can no longer recover as a species? That concept, if you follow the news at all, hits very close to home.

Author Alex Adams has taken our deepest fears, our worry over whether we will know if we’ve gone too far before it’s too late, and turned them into an absolutely gripping story that seems all too plausible. Zoe, a janitor at a pharmaceuticals company who has a life just like yours or mine, with problems and worries, and family and friends, and a lot of little things to think about. And then, White Horse hits the world, and none of that matters anymore. In fact, most of that doesn’t even exist anymore.

White Horse is told in a back and forth style, all from Zoe’s point of view. It switches between “then” (the time before White Horse appeared, which seems to be roughly our world now), and “now” (beginning about six months after White Horse appeared, in a drastically changed world). As Zoe travels Europe in a desperate attempt meet someone from her past, and keep herself alive long enough to do so, her flashbacks to “then” give the reader insight both into how the world has fallen so far, and Zoe’s personal story as well.

Zoe is a very easy character to empathize with, simply because she just seems so normal. She isn’t a super hero, or a genius, or magnificently rich (not that money matters anymore in the post apocalyptic world). She is simply a regular person who has seen unthinkable tragedy, and is just trying to hold on to the one thing she has left.  While it is a tale full of complete and utter tragedy, somehow Zoe’s insistence on keeping her humanity and kindness in the face of despair makes it a tale of redemption and love as well. Somehow, even with most of the world’s population either horribly mutated or dead, you just know that Zoe will make the best of it.

White Horse is an absolutely riveting read, and it doesn’t shy away from difficult topics that would definitely arise in an actual end of the world scenario. There is some difficult subject content, such as incest and graphic violence, so I would not recommend for any but the most mature teens. But these things do not define the book; they simply serve to add realism and give readers a true sense of the horror Zoe faces day to day. White Horse is a masterfully written tale, well worth reading, and would make a great gift for the book lover in your life.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)