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Up Up Down Down Left WRITE: The Freelance Guide to Game Journalism (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 256
 
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Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
4.5/ 5


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We liked?


A step by step look at the daunting prospect of begin a career in freelance journalism.

Not so much?


More educational than entertaining, it can get a little dry at times.


Final Fiendish Findings?

While the tone is for the most part conservational and somewhat humorous, Up Up Down Down Left WRITE is a serious book that covers serious topics that must be considered before severing your steady paycheck and striking out on your own. Expect to be educated more than entertained, and you’ll find this book to be a valuable resource on your way to the top.

3
Posted August 17, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

I see what you did there…bowkerscover

Obvious nods to video game culture aside, Up Up Down Down Left WRITE is a relatively serious look at freelance journalism, from the inside. Written by industry veteran Nathan Meunier, the book guides readers on the details, big and small, of taking the video game freelance world by storm. While making a name for yourself and acquiring review copies are a definite bonus, they don’t put food in your mouth or pay the rent. Unlike similar books on gaming journalism,  Up Up Down Down Left WRITE focuses fully on being able to make a living at your trade.

Many gaming enthusiasts and hobbyist writers often fantasize about quitting their day jobs and heading off to freelance heaven, the logistics of such a move can be daunting (not to mention disastrous to your budget). Meunier takes the elements of the unknown out of the equation by giving simple yet detailed instructions on the steps writers should take to begin their journey into freelancing, as well as helpful tips for how to keep the work flowing once you’ve broken into the field.

Up Up Down Down Left WRITE covers all the things you’ve wondered about when considering a freelance career, and many you probably never really considered. While it is obviously skewed towards writers looking to working specifically in video game journalism, most of tips given apply to freelancers in any field. From setting up a home office to preparing yourself for a visit from the tax man, there is a lot more involved than simply plopping your laptop on the kitchen table and throwing some words together.

Whether you are an absolute novice just getting your start, or a somewhat experienced writer looking to make the move to steady, paying gigs, the information you’ll find in this book is pretty invaluable to making the jump successfully. The author walks you through the process for everything from pitching new editors, to handling payments, to covering your first conventions. He also touches on less obvious topics, such as depression and loneliness in a somewhat isolating career, or how to cut ties with a publication that isn’t in your best interests.

While the tone is for the most part conservational and somewhat humorous, Up Up Down Down Left WRITE is a serious book that covers serious topics that must be considered before severing your steady paycheck and striking out on your own. Expect to be educated more than entertained, and you’ll find this book to be a valuable resource on your way to the top.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)


  • Thanks for the review! Folks can purchase the book through Amazon in print or on kindle here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EBFYXJO

    Also, a free sample chapter and additional information is available at the website: http://www.freelancegamejournoguide.com

    And if anyone as any questions about the book or freelancing, feel free to drop them here!

    • Amy Hauck Nelson

      What do you think about the idea that ad blockers are crushing revenue for sites large and small, and how do you think that will affect freelancers in the long term?

      • I think that is a definite concern right now among many of the bigger gaming sites. I don’t know enough about if first-hand to really speak to the issue at length, but I think it’s something that is hurting outlets quite a bit. It could eventually impact freelance pay rates and opportunities if something else isn’t figured out.