Random Article


 
Must See..
 

The Tattoo Project: body. art. image. (Book) Review

 
tattoo-project1-620x568
tattoo-project1-620x568
tattoo-project1-620x568

 
At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 240
 
Genre:
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
4.5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


A group of photographers each offers their own unique take on a series of tattooed models.

Not so much?


The female models are not as diverse as they could be.


Final Fiendish Findings?

The Tattoo Project was an innovative started by photographer Vince Hemingson, who envisioned photographers and tattooed people spending time together in a quest for a better portrait. The idea was that their tattoos would tell a story, and by spending time together the photographers could better bring that out in their pictures. This resulted in an event spanning several days, including one hundred tattooed models and eleven photographer – as well as thousands of photos in a variety of styles.

0
Posted March 15, 2014 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“…beauty is skin deep, but a tattoo goes all the way to the bone.”

The Tattoo Project was an innovative started by photographer Vince Hemingson, who envisioned photographers and tattooed people spending time together in a quest for a better portrait. The idea was that their tattoos would tell a story, and by spending time together the photographers could better bring that out in their pictures. This resulted in an event spanning several days, including one hundred tattooed models and eleven photographer – as well as thousands of photos in a variety of styles.

The book is divided by photographer. Though all of them had access to the same models, the way they chose to portray them differed greatly. Each section begins with a description and photo of the photographer, who often explains why the used the process they did. Vince Hemingson’s photos are featured first. He portrayed the idea of the tattoos themselves being the artwork, and so chose to shoot the models on a very minimalist background and sans clothing, allowing their ink to take center stage. What results is a series of quite stunning photographs.

Next up is Wayne A. Hoerchel, who decided to highlight the tattoos using creative lighting against an all black background. This really creates some interesting highlights and shadows that make the images of the tattoos really pop. One of the strengths of The Tattoo Project: body. art. image. is that the photographers chosen to participate in the project really bring unique ideas to the table. There are over 200 pictures in the book, and yet each section seems new. From the retro stylings of Marc Koegel, to the side by side comparisons used by Spencer Kovats, to the stark black and white images created by Syx Langemann, each series of photos manages to pull the collection into a whole new direction.

While all of the photographers brought their A game to the table, my favorite section far and beyond was that of Melanie Jane. Her vision was of heavily tattooed models portrayed in old school housewife roles. All of her models are female, and she dressed them up in  pinup style  high heels, retro lingerie, and all. To see these unconventional women portrayed in traditional roles offers a stark contrast between how they see themselves and how society views them, and the pinup style serves well to enhance their beauty.

The Tattoo Project: body. art. image. is a book filled with beautiful photos that are as unique as they people they portray. My one complaint is that, while the models are meant to be unconventional, they often aren’t. In a project that is meant to highlight unique individuals, I truly expected to see models of every age, size, and ethnicity. And in the male models pictured, I did. There are men young and old, in different colors and sizes, and some with very interesting if not conventionally attractive faces. And yet the female models, unconventional though they may be in their copious ink, are almost exclusively of the young white female variety.

The Tattoo Project: body. art. image. is a book that celebrates both the art of photography and the living canvases that are the tattooed models. Featuring a variety of photographers who each bring their own unique styles to the project, it’s an homage to ink that is much more than a great conversation piece.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)