Random Article


 
Must See..
 

The Science of Good Food (Book) Review

 
51X5IlNJw2L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
51X5IlNJw2L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
51X5IlNJw2L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

 
At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 624
 
Genre: ,
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


Tons of fascinating facts on how the processes of cooking work, as well as interesting history and new recipes to try.

Not so much?


Would have liked to see even more recipes - however, it's already a hefty volume at over 600 pages.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Most of us know many of the little “tricks” for making our cooking just that much better. Always cream the butter and sugar first, sifting the flour for lightness, etc. But how many of us actually know why that stuff works? Not many, and the thing is, having a better understanding of the processes that […]

0
Posted January 2, 2015 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Most of us know many of the little “tricks” for making our cooking just that much better. Always cream the butter and sugar first, sifting the flour for lightness, etc. But how many of us actually know why that stuff works? Not many, and the thing is, having a better understanding of the processes that are going on when we cook can make us all much better cooks.

And that’s the idea behind The Science of Good Food. Less a cookbook and more a manual of all things food, it’s a fascinating read that explains exactly what is going on when you whip up those egg whites, add a little thickener to your broth, or knead your bread dough. Even if you thought you had a little understanding about how it all works, you’ll be surprised at how a little more knowledge goes a long way in perfecting your favorite dishes.

The Science of Good Food is a truly comprehensive book, and it’s set up in a way that makes it easy to either page to your favorites (or whatever it is you’re currently working on), or simply read the thing from cover to cover (if you’re a science and/or cooking nerd, you’ll be in heaven). There are carts on everything from how to get exactly the cookie you want (crispy, soft, flat, etc.) to common legumes, and all of it is quite easy to read and understand.

The book is set up more like an encyclopedia than your average cookbook, with all items listed in alphabetical order (as well as cross-referenced extensively for easy location). For each item listed, there is information on what it is (this can include history, varieties, where it grows, and more) and what it does (this varies depending on the item – gluten, for instance, explains the various processes of it, while mushrooms focuses more on types). The coolest part of each section, for me anyway, was How It Works. Just like it sounds, this explains in easy to understand but fascinating how each item works. Interspersed throughout the book are also little boxes on things like “science wise”, “kitchen wisdom”, and “fast facts”, adding interesting little tidbits, and there are even recipes included under their various ingredients.

All of this information truly has the power to take your cooking up a notch. If you understand the process behind whipping cream, for instance, you’ll be able to produce better results by employing them. In some cooking, even the type of bowl you are using can affect your results, so it’s truly a matter of knowledge is power. And it isn’t just knowledge of foods themselves – this book contains information on all things cooking, from processes like basting and drying, to the oven you use to cook. Whether you’re the type who loves knowledge in any form, or you’re seeking something to take your cooking to the next level, The Science of Good Food is a great read that will get you excited about cooking the right way.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)