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The Baby Signing Book, Second Edition (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 288
 
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Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
4/ 5


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A comprehensive look at signing with your child, from birth and beyond.

Not so much?


Not meant to be read from start to finish - rather is separated into ages.


Final Fiendish Findings?

The Baby Signing Book uses American Sign Language to teach communication to babies and toddlers long before they are able to express themselves verbally. With helpful techniques and suggestions, as well as detailed instructions on signing, parents can start their children on signing pretty much from birth. With a variety of anecdotes from experienced signing parents, readers are able to get a look into what life as a signing family can be.

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Posted August 20, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Gimme just a little sign.24338

As mother to five and aunt to nineteen, I consider myself to be somewhat of an expert on babies. As such, I’m fascinated with the idea of communicating with them before they are able to be verbal. I used some very basic signs with my kids to varied success, but The Baby Signing Book seeks to take things to a whole new level. With signs for everything from again to zoo, communicating with your young one is as easy as snapping (or waving) your fingers.

The Baby Signing Book is separated into easy to use sections that explain the benefits and techniques to signing with kids at different ages, from newborn to age three, as well as the benefits of signing with special needs children. It also includes a number of songs to sign with your children, and 450 official ASL (American Sign Language) signs to choose from. In each age category, there are tips and suggestions on how to work signing into your daily routine. For newborns, this can be as simple as signing “milk” when feeding, or “change” for diaper time. While newborns can’t be expected to sign back, parents may be surprised to find that their babies are able to sign to them long before they become verbal.

The approach suggested by author Sara Bingham is a very gentle one. Signing should be introduced through daily interaction, but children should not be forced or made to pressured, lest frustration set in. In fact, the idea behind signing to young children is to reduce frustration, as they are able to signify their needs in this way even before they can express themselves verbally. By using a combination of repetition and fun activities like signing along to books and songs, children will benefit both in the short and long term from parents who help them to make their needs known.

One of my favorite aspects of The Baby Signing Book is that it contains a lot of anecdotes from parents who have signed with their children. Regardless of the reason behind beginning to sign (deaf family members, language delay, or just an interest in signing), parents offer encouraging tales of their adventures in signing. These really help the reader get a sense of what they can expect from their signing experience, from overcoming skepticism  from extended family, to the pride they will feel when their child begins to communicate with them.

The Baby Signing Book uses American Sign Language to teach communication to babies and toddlers long before they are able to express themselves verbally. With helpful techniques and suggestions, as well as detailed instructions on signing, parents can start their children on signing pretty much from birth. With a variety of anecdotes from experienced signing parents, readers are able to get a look into what life as a signing family can be.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)