Random Article


 
Must See..
 

The Saffron Falcon (Book) Review

 
91Cvob2w8PL._SL1500_
91Cvob2w8PL._SL1500_
91Cvob2w8PL._SL1500_

 
At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 283
 
Genre: ,
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
3.5/ 5


User Rating
no ratings yet

 

We liked?


A fast paced thriller that keeps you guessing.

Not so much?


A little hard to get into at first.


Final Fiendish Findings?

The Saffron Falcon is a fast paced book, filled with unexpected twists and turns that keep you guessing till the very end.

0
Posted November 5, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

J.E. Hopkins brings a tale of magic and intrigue with the release of fantasy thriller The Saffron Falcon.

Magical kids – it’s a premise we readers have seen a lot lately. From the magic that is Harry Potter to the craze over Twilight, adolescents with extraordinary abilities of one sort or another have taken the reading world by storm. At some point, though, it starts to seem like it’s all been done before. With so many books, television shows, and movies depicting just that scenario, how can anyone possibly come up with a way to present it that hasn’t been done?

Surprisingly, The Saffron Falcon does just that. Admittedly, I had a hard time getting into at first – call it magical teenager fatigue, if you will. After I got more into the book, though, it really caught my interest in a way I didn’t expect. Author Hopkins has presented a new idea, and he presents it rather thrillingly. Although it can be a little hard to get into at first, it makes up for it in spades as the story advances.

The world of The Saffron Falcon is our world, pretty much like the one we live in now. It is the year 2015, technology is rampant, and terrorists are a very real threat. The biggest difference between that world and this is the idea of Transition. Transition is a magical puberty of sorts (I know, bear with me for a little bit here). For one month in their lives, kids enter Transition -which gives them the ability to use magic, for that month only. Kids in Transition are marked by their violet eye color, making it easy to tell who has entered it.

This is important because there is a catch with Transition (there’s always a catch, isn’t there?). If kids choose to use magic, the magic they use must be completely unique – meaning, no one, ever, can have used the magic in the same way. If they use magic that has already been done, they forfeit their life. Naturally, by the year 2015 nearly everything has already been done, at some point in the past. And so, the focus of the government turns to preventing the use of magic at all during Transition, in order to minimize deaths.

So, when an artifact is found that appears to suspend this requirement of uniqueness, the idea of it falling into the wrong hands is enough to risk everything to get it. The Saffron Falcon follows the story of government agents from the Department of Transition as they seek to avert disaster, as well as several kids who are going through the process of Transition. It’s a fast paced book, filled with unexpected twists and turns that keep you guessing till the very end.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)