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Paranormal Niagara (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 114
 
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Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
2.5/ 5


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Plenty of spooky cases to sink your teeth into.

Not so much?


Not many details, and presented rather clinically.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Cases of the Mysterious and the Macabre Peter Andrew Sacco, host of tv’s Niagara’s Most Haunted, offers a chilling volume filled with paranormal experiences and escapades in the Niagara area. With everything from poltergeists and haunted houses to spooky forests and phantoms among us, it seems to cover pretty much everything you could ask for […]

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Posted October 21, 2014 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Cases of the Mysterious and the Macabre

Peter Andrew Sacco, host of tv’s Niagara’s Most Haunted, offers a chilling volume filled with paranormal experiences and escapades in the Niagara area. With everything from poltergeists and haunted houses to spooky forests and phantoms among us, it seems to cover pretty much everything you could ask for in a spooky Halloween read. But will it leave you shaking in your boots, or shaking your head in disappointment?

With the popularity of tv shows visiting all sorts of “haunted” locations, the time is right for books on the same subject matter. Most of us are fascinated by matters of a paranormal nature, and it’s a lot more fun to read about the creepy experiences of others than it is to actually go through that sort of thing yourself. In Paranormal Niagara, the author takes readers through a number of locations throughout the Niagara area that are widely considered to be haunted. The book is divided into sections, with each section covering a single location or haunting.

For each area, readers are presented with background of the area, some details of the case or location, as well as generally some eye witness testimony of some of the paranormal activity that has gone on there. Then, the author lists a summary of the main points of the case. The idea is that it is up to the reader to decided whether each case is a legitimate case of paranormal activity, or whether it is just a case of overactive imaginations. It’s a good idea in theory – just put the information out there, and let the readers come to their own conclusions.

In practice, what ends up happening is a lot of the spine chilling creepiness that most people look for in a book of this type is lost in the process. Why this happens is a combination of a few things. For one thing, there just aren’t enough details in many of the cases, and what is there is often presented rather clinically. That’s nice for some things, but people reading this type of book generally look for it to be a bit spooky. In some of the cases, there seems to be hardly any information at all. For instance, in the section on haunted forests, all it consists of is saying that some people think some forests are haunted, and then an accounting of the author hiking through one of those forests with some friends, who make comments about it feeling a little creepy. That’s it, and that just doesn’t feel like a true paranormal case in my book.

If you’re looking for a spooky read this Halloween season, likely your thoughts will turn to haunted houses and creepy poltergeists. In Paranormal Niagara, you’ll get that and more, but you may end up disappointed in the lack of creepiness you’ll find within it’s pages.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)