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Naked Came The Post-Postmodernist (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 231
 
Genre:
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
2.5/ 5


User Rating
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We liked?


Twists and turns all over the place, with an ending that defies prediction.

Not so much?


There is just too much gong on at times, with characters being introduced that take up space but don't really go anywhere.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Naked Came The Post-Postmodernist is a very cool concept – take a class full of writers, and put their hard work towards something a little more tangible than a series of short stories. While the book suffers at times from too many voices, it is overall a very readable story. There are twists and turns all over the place, and I guarantee you won’t figure out the end before you reach it. While it’s not a perfectly cohesive story, it is worth reading for the novelty alone. How often do you get the opportunity to read a book with thirteen different authors?

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Posted January 6, 2014 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Naked Came The Post-Postmodernist is an interesting experiment. Can an entire class of aspiring writers pull together a book that both actually makes sense, and is worth the time it takes to read it? Written by thirteen Sarah Lawrence students as part of a fiction workshop, it’s a book that attempts to take many different styles and ideas and blend them into one cohesive tale. While it suffers a bit from the attempt to combine so many perspectives, what results is an interesting story that takes some bizarre twists and turns as it winds to an unexpected finish.

Eric Davenport is a math professor at Underhill, an exclusive artsy college that seems heavy on hipsters and teenaged angst. When he turns up dead under mysterious circumstances, an investigation is kicked off that uncovers a lot of leads and unusual circumstances, but no obvious culprit. The chain smoking, old school Detective Harsley and his charming young partner Carl are on the case, with help from Kate, the attractive and intelligent medical examiner.

As they wind deeper into the circumstances surrounding Davenport’s death, they encounter a host of characters who were connected to him in a variety of ways. There’s Grace, the young art student who has a suspiciously close relationship with her married professor, and Imogen, her lovesick roommate who just happens to be obsessed with praying mantises – the insects that are a puzzling constant throughout the case. Clay is an artist turned writer who is desperate to stand out, and Allen is the upper classman hoping to catch his eye. Then there are the various faculty members, the twin teenaged boys, Davenport’s wife, Harsley’s ex-wife, the strange college student who hopes the crack the case, and more. It is here that I think the story suffers – there are just too many characters introduced and left undeveloped, and it makes the story ultimately more disjointed than it should be, as each author tries to put their own stamps on the tale.

Naked Came The Post-Postmodernist is a very cool concept – take a class full of writers, and put their hard work towards something a little more tangible than a series of short stories. While the book suffers at times from too many voices, it is overall a very readable story. There are twists and turns all over the place, and I guarantee you won’t figure out the end before you reach it. While it’s not a perfectly cohesive story, it is worth reading for the novelty alone. How often do you get the opportunity to read a book with thirteen different authors?


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)