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Dualed (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Genre: ,
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


Gripping story line.

Not so much?


Violent themes throughout.


Final Fiendish Findings?

While there are obvious themes of violence throughout, there isn’t anything else in the way of objectionable content (sexual content, profanity, etc.). Dualed is intended for teens and young adult readers, and it hits the mark quite well. It should appeal to Hunger Games fans, certainly, but West is a very relatable character that should appeal to just about any reader – adults included. There is violence, and the threat of it, entwined in the whole tale, but it only serves to instill in readers the sense of urgency and danger that is West’s life. Dualed is just a fantastic novel, all around, and I can’t wait to see what Chapman has in store for us next.

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Posted January 28, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“From the moment you get your assignment and you make the decision to run, life changes in the most momentous of ways. It’s no longer a question of what you’re going to do that day, what you’re going to eat, who you’re going to see. It’s how you’re going to survive until the next day comes.”

After reading this book, all I can say is “Wow.” Dualed is author Elsie Chapman’s first book, but I am certain it will not be her last. She writes as if her words are a brush, painting a vivid picture on the page. From the very first pages, you feel not only as if you know West (the main character), but as if you actually are West. Her thoughts, her feelings, her struggles, all feel like yours as well. From the first page to the last, this is a book you absolutely will not want to put down.

With the rampant success of The Hunger Games novels, the idea of teenagers killing each other in some messed up version of our future is not exactly a novel ideal (pun totally intended). But in Dualed, Chapman manages to make it something new – and not so completely unbelievable. An unintended consequence of a universal vaccine for the cold has rendered the human race completely sterile, and so science (and The Board) has stepped in.

Since people can no longer have children conventionally, children are made. But with the outside world in chaos and constant war outside the walls of the gated city, the populants must  be the best of the best. And so, a twisted system is born. Every child that is born will be a matched set. Two genetically identical children are created from the combined genes of two families. Each child will be raised by their respective families, and sent to master the combat and weapons training that is given to all in the city, always wondering when they will receive their assignments.

In a world at war, it is imperative that only the strong survive, ad The Board ensures that with the idea of alts and assignments. Your alt is your genetic twin, and the assignment is to kill them, or be killed yourself. In this new world, every child will receive their assignment somewhere between their tenth and twentieth birthdays. Once the two alts “go active”, they have just thirty-one days to kill or be killed, or a self destruct sequence hidden in their genetic code will kill them both. It is both a cruel and efficient system, ensuring that all adults who walk the city have been proven capable of killing.

The heroine of Dualed, West, is just fifteen years old, but already she has seen so much death – both in her own family and in the streets of her city, as “completions” can happen at any time, in any place. With little to hold on to other than some well worn weapons and Chord, a childhood friend, West will do anything and everything to make sure that she will “be the one.”

While there are obvious themes of violence throughout, there isn’t anything else in the way of objectionable content (sexual content, profanity, etc.). Dualed is intended for teens and young adult readers, and it hits the mark quite well. It should appeal to Hunger Games fans, certainly, but West is a very relatable character that should appeal to just about any reader – adults included. There is violence, and the threat of it, entwined in the whole tale, but it only serves to instill in readers the sense of urgency and danger that is West’s life. Dualed is just a fantastic novel, all around, and I can’t wait to see what Chapman has in store for us next.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)