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David Carter’s 100 (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 20
 
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Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
4/ 5


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We liked?


Fun lift the flap book that makes counting to one hundred an adventure.

Not so much?


Excited fingers may have trouble refolding without ripping.


Final Fiendish Findings?

David Carter’s 100 is a fun counting book that uses a unique style of folding to hide multiple flaps on top of each other, giving curious kids the chance to uncover each of the numbers from one to one hundred. Colorful illustrations feature everything from the beach to jungle animals, making higher level counting an easy sell.

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Posted April 3, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-niiiiiiine, thirty!

Raising kids today is all about cramming in education. From toddler violin lessons to science camp for kindergartners, kids are over scheduled and often stressed – all in a somewhat misguided attempt to give them the very best start in life. While studies have often showed that many of these activities actually have very little effect on their future successes, there is one thing that has been proven over and over again to give children a great head start: reading. Reading with your kids fosters a love of the written word, offers some great quality (and snuggle) time with parents, and provides mental building blocks that they’ll rely on in school. So how do you get your kids to love reading as much as you do? A really great book.

David Carter’s 100 is a book for young kids that plays off their love of surprises. While it is intended to jumpstart their counting skills by naming off one hundred different items, it does so in a way that most kids captivating. With one hundred different flaps that fold in on each other, this is the champion of lift the flap books. While that might sound a bit bulky, all those flaps are done in a very cool way that guarantees your child will open the numbers in order. Each page of the book contains five flaps, but you only see one. As you lift the flap, you’ll find another underneath, and another, and each of them fold out in different ways to make for a fun and engaging read.

While my kids were sold on the basis of the lifting flaps alone, David Carter has also done a great job with colorful illustrations that kids love. Each set of pages carries a different them, and each of the flaps, and the items you count, fit the themes. For instance, the first two pages are an under the sea theme, with items like coral and jellyfish. Other themes include transportation, the farm, dinosaurs, and school – all favorites of the 2-5 year old crowd. I read the book with a 4, 6, and 8 year old, and all three of them proclaimed it to be awesome, citing the cool flaps and fun pictures as there favorite features.

Of course, with any lift the flap book, parents have to wonder how quickly they’re going to be gluing flaps back on or tossing the book in frustration. The flaps themselves are about normal for this type of book – not overly strong, but not super flimsy either. While the innovative hidden flaps will delight your children, since they all have to be folded back in the right order, may cause some rips from children of the overzealous type, so that’s something to think about. Also, you won’t find any sort of story line in the book, as David Carter’s 100 is all about the counting. Still, we found it to be an enjoyable introduction to higher levels of counting, and a nice change from the books that all seem to stop at ten.

David Carter’s 100 is a fun counting book that uses a unique style of folding to hide multiple flaps on top of each other, giving curious kids the chance to uncover each of the numbers from one to one hundred. Colorful illustrations feature everything from the beach to jungle animals, making higher level counting an easy sell.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)