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Confessions of a Self-Help Writer (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 162
 
Genre:
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
2.5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 

We liked?


A unique story line, with a lot of promise at the outset.

Not so much?


Keeps you wondering about just about everything, without enough development to really get you into the story.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Confessions of a Self-Help Writer is a decent attempt at a quite unique storyline. Told from the perspective of one who knew, loved, and was subsequently betrayed, it starts out with a lot of teasers that get you interested to find out just who Michael Enzo is. Unfortunately, it never really delivers on its promise of a peek inside that mind, or really even explains much of Enzo’s story. Confessions of a Self-Help Writer is a quick read, a unique read, but unfortunately not a great read.

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Posted May 1, 2014 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“Is New Orleans my oyster? I’m allergic to shellfish.”

For me, that line neatly sums up Confessions of a Self-Help Writer – a little bit funny, a little bit weird, and kind of confusing. It’s billed as sort of a revenge-fueled publish of a private diary, never meant for the world at large. The author, Benjamin W. DeHaven, states at the beginning of the book that this is a true story of love, loss, and betrayal that occurred between he and his business partner of twenty years, Michael Enzo.

It’s not a true story, though – and it seems to set up a whole lot of interesting plot points that are then barely touched upon in the book itself. Michael Enzo is meant to be a charismatic character, the quintessential lovable con man. Enzo has written over a hundred self-help books, many of them as a ghost writer for celebrities and public figures – but while he has written dozens of books on how to help yourself, he just can’t seem to get it together. He lies, he cheats, he steals, he gambles – and most of all, he betrays just about everyone he has come into contact with.

Sounds like an interesting story, right? As DeHaven tells it at the beginning of the book, Enzo defrauded both him and Enzo’s wife Susan, and then disappeared. The two of them have published the found diary as revenge for all Enzo has done. And so, with that kind of setup, you’d expect the diary to be a rather riveting look inside the mind of a con man. Instead, it’s a disjointed story that is quite hard to keep up with. It touches on a variety of interesting points, like his writing jobs, his drug use and alcohol abuse, and even some time working with the mob. But each and every point that is touched on is barely developed at all, and mostly leaves you wondering what the heck is going on. Added to that, it seems like every woman Enzo loves is named Susan. I don’t know what’s up with that, but considering at least one of them died and the other ends up with DeHaven, it’s hard to keep straight just how many Susans are even around.

Confessions of a Self-Help Writer is a decent attempt at a quite unique storyline. Told from the perspective of one who knew, loved, and was subsequently betrayed, it starts out with a lot of teasers that get you interested to find out just who Michael Enzo is. Unfortunately, it never really delivers on its promise of a peek inside that mind, or really even explains much of Enzo’s story. Confessions of a Self-Help Writer is a quick read, a unique read, but unfortunately not a great read.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)