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Bargad (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

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Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
3/ 5


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We liked?


Offers a child friendly look at Indian culture.

Not so much?


The rhyming format makes for some confusing phrasing at times.


Final Fiendish Findings?

Bargad is an interesting look at Indian culture, presented in a child friendly way that is appealing to young children. While the rhyming format does result in some confusing phrasing at times, it is overall a book that my testers (ages five and seven) enjoyed. Storybooks like Bargad are a great way to introduce different cultures to your children at an early age, with an eye towards a larger world view as they grow.

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Posted December 17, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

Bargad is the story of a stately banyan tree. At the beginning of the tale, Bargad is a respected and revered member of the village. Under his giant limbs is a favorite place for the children, and he is honored each summer during the annual Vat Savitri celebration as ties are wrapped around him to symbolize strengthening family ties.

But times change, and as the little village of Vikasnagar grows into a city, the people (and the mayor in particular) lose touch with those parts of nature that were previously revered. Soon, a campaign is begun to get rid of Bargad. After all, the giant tree is merely in the way, blocking roads and generally taking up a lot of space. When a new playground is built for the children, there is no longer any reason to keep Bargad around, and a date is set to chop the old tree down. While the people may feel it’s time to go, Mother Nature has different ideas about it, and soon the people of Vikasnagar will appreciate once again their oldest resident, a banyan tree named Bargad.

Bargad is a story written by a father who wished to keep the memories and values of his childhood in India alive for his family after their move to America. It is written by Subhash Kommuru, illustrated by his wife Sujata, and dedicated to their child, Arya. It is apparent that it is a story written with reverence for the banyan, the national tree of India, and the elements of Indian culture laced throughout the story add interest for children of any nationality.

The story of Bargad is illustrated in a crayon drawing style which my young testers found colorful and appealing. Like many books for young children, it is told in child friendly rhymes. The rhyming format of the book does take a little away from the appeal of the story, however, as it can be difficult to understand at times given the way some passages are phrased. Bargad’s story may have been better told without the rhymes, as the phrasing confuses at times.

Bargad is an interesting look at Indian culture, presented in a child friendly way that is appealing to young children. While the rhyming format does result in some confusing phrasing at times, it is overall a book that my testers (ages five and seven) enjoyed. Storybooks like Bargad are a great way to introduce different cultures to your children at an early age, with an eye towards a larger world view as they grow.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)