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Asunder (Book) Review

 
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At a Glance...
 

Page Count: 196
 
Genre:
 
Author:
 
Year Published:
 
Final Score
 
 
 
 
 
3/ 5


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We liked?


An introspective look at a life failing.

Not so much?


Has a dark and morose tone to it.


Final Fiendish Findings?

As readers are pulled into Marie’s day to day life, they are struck with how poignant the idea of a lifetime lost to monotony truly is. Whether Marie will realize that her life is truly passing her by, or simply fall hopelessly into the routine of museum life like her grandfather before her is in question throughout the book, serving as a reminder for all of us to seize the life we want, not the one we have just grown accustomed to.

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Posted October 15, 2013 by

 
Full Fiendish Findings...
 
 

“We are watchmen, sentinels, but we don’t polish guns, shoes, or egos. We are custodians of a national treasure, a treasure beyond value…”

As a guard at the National Gallery in London, Marie spends her days guarding the nation’s treasures from the grasping fingers and peering faces of locals and tourists alike. While the job is undoubtedly an important one, the ones who choose the monotony of guard work feel less revered than looked down upon, and this is a fact that grates on Marie as she makes her daily rounds. In fact, as the days run into each other after nine years at the Gallery, Marie’s inner world becomes ever more tumultuous, and often violent, even as her outer facade stays stoic and professional.

As her dissatisfaction grows in her professional life, her personal life seems also less than it should be. Evenings are often spent with her best friend Daniel, a guard at a different museum who is possessed of a drive to create poetry and a troubling limp. Friends for years, Marie and Daniel still manage to keep their relationship more on the surface than truly deep – but all that seems poised to change when the two decide to get away to Paris for a few weeks of vacation. Can their relationship remain unchanged in the face of so much together time? Should it?

Marie is a decidedly complicated character. Quiet and reserved on the outside, her inner thoughts reveal a level if disturbance and rancor that is expressed rarely. It is only in her painstakingly detailed landscapes that she unleashes the emotions that lie within. Forests, valleys, mountains – even a volcano – these works of art are Marie’s only true outlet. The fact that she chooses to replace any human element in each of her landscapes with deceased moths serves only to highlight the level of disturbance she fills within.

Asunder is not one of those books you read when you’re looking for a light, casual read, or a thrilling adventure. It is a story best read from an introspective mood. As readers are pulled into Marie’s day to day life, they are struck with how poignant the idea of a lifetime lost to monotony truly is. Whether Marie will realize that her life is truly passing her by, or simply fall hopelessly into the routine of museum life like her grandfather before her is in question throughout the book, serving as a reminder for all of us to seize the life we want, not the one we have just grown accustomed to.


Amy

 
U.S. Senior Editor & Deputy EIC, @averyzoe on Twitter, mother of 5, gamer, reader, wife to @macanthony, and all-around bad-ass (no, not really)